Internet dating cancer survivors

21-Jan-2017 11:36 by 5 Comments

Internet dating cancer survivors - dating someone in the coast guard

If you’re still in treatment or have obvious physical changes, you will probably need to talk about it sooner.With online dating, you can even reveal your situation before arranging a meeting.

I was coming out of a sh-tty six months—I’d been diagnosed as stage I, at age 34, and had a right-side mastectomy, chemo, and a new breast reconstructed using tissue from my belly. So when I met this man at a bar on a rare night out with a girlfriend, I was out of practice; my sexuality was asleep. Then he touched my new breast, which I could not and will not ever feel, and I started crying, angry, like, ' Don’t bother! ' He looked me in the eye and said, ' But you remember, right? ' Well, then, close your eyes and remember.' It was the most beautiful thing anyone could have said to me. Guys who read my profile say, ' Congratulations on your survivorship!Still, some survivors say they’ve gained in important ways from their cancer experience.They feel stronger and wiser, value relationships more, and are clearer about what qualities they think are most important in prospective partners.My male patients are often overwhelmed by the number of single women who respond, instantaneously for one of my patients, with identical “likes.” I never knew so many women were interested in hunting and fishing—or who think that men are!My female patients report that the men they meet don’t look much like their profile photos—hair loss and 20 pounds of extra weight are often the reality of meeting in person. My patients ask me what they should do next—and having never registered a profile myself, I am not able to provide much more than common sense suggestions.They often want to find someone with whom to share their life—and this is a real challenge.

There are times when I am tempted to start a matchmaking service for the men and women, both gay and straight, who tell me how lonely they are and how they long for someone to share their life with. I often hear stories that describe how difficult it is to dip an older toe into the world of dating in 2015; the world is so different from the 1950s and 1960s when last they were single.Once upon a time, women who have survived cancer will tell you, the fact that you’d been through the horror of a diagnosis and surgery was not public information—not at work and certainly not on a first date.Flash forward to 2016 and, experts say, there’s a very different attitude.“Breast cancer survivors offer a unique understanding of the value of life—and love.”) The women you’re about to meet— Jenny, Kristina, and Nicole—are proof.Jenny Saldaña, 45, an actress, comedian and Ford Model of Courage living in New York City; diagnosed 11 years ago"When I signed up for OKCupid, they asked, What’s the most private thing you’re willing to admit?For example, certain cancer treatments leave patients unable to have sex.